Month: April 2013

Approaches to Another Narrative

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APPROACHES TO LONG POEMS OF THIS NARRATIVE

by Kenyatta Jean-Paul Garcia

and

Anna Elena Eyre

  • Although temporal this narrative is non-chronological, non-hierarchical and non-linear and more akin to that of a spiral with layered complexity as well as the backward, forward and present trajectories of moment(s).
  • The idea of the image of an occurrence is the motive for this narrative and the motivation for readers to enter into the story as well as to have the story enter into them.
  • This narrative emphasizes transition/attention/relation not action/conflict/heroism.
  • This narrative is no longer storytelling, it is story-talking.
  • This narrative is highly interpretative on behalf of the reader because of authorial choices.
  • In this narrative the reader in some ways becomes the writer because the text requires participation to be determined.  It is because of participation that we can locate and re-create a poetic tradition that requires personal enactment.
  • This narrative engages delimited and ultra-discursive identity, naming, setting, plot and experiences.
  • This narrative wishes to escape the literary narrative (resolution, coda, evaluation and exposition) to bring about a linguistic narrative (intuitive temporal sequencing, displacement, coordinate clauses, orientation complication, and an abstracted exposition).
  • This narrative is primarily textual and utilizes translation of oral poetic strategies including: patterns of recurrences; morphology; deixis; pitch; juxtaposition; minimal vocabulary; variation; improvisation; rhyming that can be but does not necessarily have to be sounded but rather based in associative resonances; as well as rhyming that is unpredictable and spontaneous.
  • This narrative is a mirror or window that has been shattered but each shard is a piece of and offers another jagged perspective of the whole that is necessarily indefinite.
  • This narrative explores othering, exile, hybridism and errantry.
  • Voice is key to this narrative.

Ghazal For Ginsberg

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 Ghazal For Ginsberg

by

E. S. Cormac

Tell us this story, goddess daughter of Zeus, beginning at whatever point you will.

I have studied your immense enumerations grey beard

I carefully crafted lines in response to shopping list strophes jazz beard

Thrown away to mind’s inner recesses and 182GB of RAM that’s all I have left either way

It is our pleasure to report neon fruit hydrogen jukeboxes the least of worries, father beard

It started off beautiful lines echoing your madness devoured minds of generation

Poseidon’s blinded children air out intimacies despite song of emperor’s fiddle, vigilant beard

It lead away to Troy’s shores and roster of ship’s crews using exacting turn-o-phrase

They snap fingers in cafe bravo to poetic truths of high school journal keepers now, beat beard

Lines stopped weary of flowing thoughts returned to foreign fiord

Struggle self society is it lost in transliteration mouthings, pariah beard

I am tired of them. I am tired of their flying circus. I don’t want to be a clown. I want to look outside

IWW, CCCP, LBGT, your Spartan Phalluses battled Barbara Billinglsy boulevards kabala beard

I will no longer write of the I, the me,  the we, the ours.

It is our pleasure to report, sertraline, fluoxetine, replace cerebellum scars now, committed beard

I will become Clipper of Coupons for Packets of Tea. I, soldier of emperors, swear, grand beard.

I am having a slow epiphany beatnik beard.

The beatnik poets as a whole, and Allen Ginsburg in particular, struggled against the norms of society. Through verse and prose they spoke of taboos, railed against mainstream America, and confessed dark desires in a style that also rebelled against the formal literature of the time. Whether through translation or imitation this style is what is most remembered and copied today. Hidden in the human caricature that has become the Beat Writer’s are the real life struggles of men against their society. A society they felt alienated from somehow.

What Exactly Depends Upon a Red Wheelbarrow?

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Karissa Morton Carter

For one of my poetry classes, we have been reading John Felstiner’s Can Poetry Save the Earth.  In preparation for a Skype session with Felstiner on Monday night, he sent us a list of poems he wanted us to consider, along with some questions about each.  In regards to William Carlos Williams’ infamous “The Red Wheelbarrow,” he asked the simple question:  “How much depends, and why?”  I’m a ramble-thinker.  I blab & (attempt to) condense, so welcome—my process of figuring out the answer to that question.

The choice of the word “glazed” in particular strikes me as it positions the reader in a very specific relation to both time & weather—two things completely out of our control.  The wheelbarrow is not “dripping” or “drenched,” as it would be if it were currently raining, yet it’s not “dry” or even just “damp” as though the rain’s been over for…

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