Approaches to Another Narrative

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APPROACHES TO LONG POEMS OF THIS NARRATIVE

by Kenyatta Jean-Paul Garcia

and

Anna Elena Eyre

  • Although temporal this narrative is non-chronological, non-hierarchical and non-linear and more akin to that of a spiral with layered complexity as well as the backward, forward and present trajectories of moment(s).
  • The idea of the image of an occurrence is the motive for this narrative and the motivation for readers to enter into the story as well as to have the story enter into them.
  • This narrative emphasizes transition/attention/relation not action/conflict/heroism.
  • This narrative is no longer storytelling, it is story-talking.
  • This narrative is highly interpretative on behalf of the reader because of authorial choices.
  • In this narrative the reader in some ways becomes the writer because the text requires participation to be determined.  It is because of participation that we can locate and re-create a poetic tradition that requires personal enactment.
  • This narrative engages delimited and ultra-discursive identity, naming, setting, plot and experiences.
  • This narrative wishes to escape the literary narrative (resolution, coda, evaluation and exposition) to bring about a linguistic narrative (intuitive temporal sequencing, displacement, coordinate clauses, orientation complication, and an abstracted exposition).
  • This narrative is primarily textual and utilizes translation of oral poetic strategies including: patterns of recurrences; morphology; deixis; pitch; juxtaposition; minimal vocabulary; variation; improvisation; rhyming that can be but does not necessarily have to be sounded but rather based in associative resonances; as well as rhyming that is unpredictable and spontaneous.
  • This narrative is a mirror or window that has been shattered but each shard is a piece of and offers another jagged perspective of the whole that is necessarily indefinite.
  • This narrative explores othering, exile, hybridism and errantry.
  • Voice is key to this narrative.

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