Terrible Animals by Chris D’Errico

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Terrible Animals

by

Chris D’Errico

Terrible Animals by C.DERRICO

Bio: Chris D’Errico has worked as a short order cook, a doorman, a neon sign-maker’s helper, and an exterminator, among other vocational adventures. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts, he lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, with his wife Tracy, and a small clouder of house cats. For more, visit www.clderrico.com.”

SOURCE TEXT: “A Field Guide To Critical Thinking” by James W. Lett, from the book “The Hundredth Monkey And Other Paradigms of the Paranormal”… Filtered through insomnia  and nervous impulse. Inspired by Salvador Dalí’s description of his paranoiac-critical method: “a spontaneous method of irrational knowledge based on the critical and systematic objectivity of the associations and interpretations of delirious phenomena.”

Lodging by Stephanie Kaylor

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lodging

by 

Stephanie Kaylor

 

the other world rewards me

with memories

blank eternally

as a photograph,

shapes and colors

 

the remnants of their explosion

out of context

 

at land

there was a flock of starlings,

I could not tell you anymore,

 

not even if the creatures,

breathing,

surrounded me again, here,

 

now

I would only see a monochrome

grouping, I would only see

the whole

 

what more could you see

when one of us breaks

 

or cloaks herself in new silks?

the great changeover armed itself

in nothing but the delusion

that you were always master

and these are all your tools

 

far-sighted

I see myself at your side, eye

-to-eye, inside which is still a tincture

of the time before you and I

 

in my eye too

was the house, the glorious

overthrow of the ledger

the markings of our losses

 

I never saw

the inside but as spectator

I knew, with all the windows

leading to all the rooms

that I could house them together

there were no padlocks

here nor a single car

not a telephone wire, a time

or a name or a face misplaced.

 

Poetic Statement: Let me mourn. Let me dream. Let me see you not as how you present yourself to be but how I envisage. Let me write my story, let me turn the pages, let me bridge subject and object with my own brand of ink. It isn’t white ink, ink of life, the glorified rape of the canon, sowing its seed in anyone’s lap. It’s the red ink, the ink that transcends the permanence of the whole thing and rewrites, retells, the nagging voice in the background your history sought to cut out. It’s the ink that seeks not to hide glitches but to bring them to the center light.

 

Bio: Stephanie Kaylor is based in upstate New York where she is completing a MA in Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies. She is also a current MA student at European Graduate school, concentrating in narrative structure and desire. Though her musings are not political in content, she is an ardent supporter of activist causes, including sex workers’ rights and prison abolition.

 

Chapbook by Francis Raven

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An Excerpt From the Chapbook:

Beginning by Spying On Cooper’s The Spy

And Ending With An Interjection from Kim

/

(Some Books I’ve Written)

By

Francis Raven

weird facts about yr neighborhood

 

so I’m reading this revolutionary war spy novel, The Spy, that takes place in Westchester county, which was a neutral ground during the war (“The county of Westchester, after the British had obtained possession of the island of New York, became common ground, in which both parties continued to act for the remainder of the war of the Revolution. A large proportion of its inhabitants, either restrained by their attachments, or influenced by their fears, affected a neutrality they did not feel.”)

 

but I don’t know much about the revolution, so I keep having to look stuff up

 

here’s the weird couple of facts: Marble Hill is politically part of Manhattan because the creek used to run north of it and there was a bridge that was important during the war, King’s Bridge (which would have been at West 230th Street) that was taken down in 1916, when the original Spuytin Duyvil Creek was filled in.  The Spuytin Duyvil Creek that’s by your crib is actually a shipping channel connecting the Hudson River to the Harlem River Ship Canal which was built in 1895.  What I’m not sure about is whether the placement of the mouth of the creek was moved…

 

 

In the neutral zone

Both sides’ irregular forces

Compete to steal

Whatever cattle are left, to plunder

swearing it

was as light as feathers.

Neutral just means chaos

In the face of a father’s final blessing.

 

 

Donald Ringe describes this demilitarized zone as a “moral wasteland where conflicting principles are at war and the only law is might…”

 

There needs to be a buffer between our intentions and the intentions of our enemy

Where we all get lost.

Click Here To Read The Entire Chapbook

Bio: Francis Raven is a Washington, D.C., based poet whose books include the volumes of poetry ARCHITECTONIC CONJECTURES: POEMS ABOUT THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (Silenced Press, 2010), Provisions (Interbirth, 2009), Shifting the Question More Complicated (Otoliths, 2007) and Taste: Gastronomic Poems (Blazevox, 2005), as well as the novel INVERTED CURVATURES (Spuyten Duyvil, 2005). Her poems have been published in Bath House, CHAIN, Big Bridge, Bird Dog, Mudlark, Caffeine Destiny, and Spindrift, among others, and her critical work can be found in Jacket, Logos, Clamor, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, The Electronic Book Review, The Emergency Almanac, The Morning News, The Brooklyn Rail, 5 Trope, In These Times, The Fulcrum Annual, Rain Taxi, and Flak.

Poetic Statement:

My Life in Art

(my priors)

 

When I first came to art, I wanted it to be different.  I wanted it to feel absolutely strange.  I wanted it to make me feel completely different. As I’ve gotten older, songs that make me feel more like me have become much more meaningful to me

 

I have this memory of buying my first CDs: I was in 7th grade at The College School, an experimental middle school in Webster Groves, a suburb of St. Louis, Missouri.  After school, I would walk down Big Bend Blvd. and walk to my friend, Elizabeth’s, house.  I don’t think we smoked pot yet, but we were close.  Actually, what I remember most was her house, a Victorian with a big wrap-around porch; I remember her porch and how we would walk down the hill to a park and read Sassy, the original Sassy, a distinction anyone of my age will recognize.  On the way to her house, I would pass Streetside Records.

 

On one trip to her house, I stopped in the store.  I didn’t know what I wanted except for a Jane’s Addiction album that I had heard Elizabeth’s sister, Rose, playing.  I bought that, but I wanted something more.  I wanted to experience the limits of human experience packaged in an easy-to-play format, which arrived, at the time, in a lengthy cardboard box.  I decided on my purchase entirely by name alone: 10,000 Maniacs, which was prominently displayed in the College Radio section (a category of music that unfortunately does not exist anymore).  Of course, I was disappointed.  10,000 Maniacs is a fine band, even really good, but they are just not about the limits of art or experience; that’s just not their shtick.  But I didn’t know that until I got home.  It was the album with Orange and Planned Obsolescence on it; both songs that I still listen to and which sound exactly like that era.  At the time, however, I had no idea that there even was such a thing as an era; youth is blissfully pre-historic.  But purchases, no matter their era, always have a way of leading to more purchases.  I didn’t necessarily have taste, but I knew what I wanted.  I wanted ecstasy in art.  And art has a funny way of wanting to be raised to the level of taste.

 

Around that time, I started reading and writing poetry; I became part of a poetry scene focused around Mokabe’s Coffee house.  I’m not sure if the poetry was any good for my age; it is still too much of its time. There was a resurgence of beat poetry, but I had no concept of such a renaissance; it was merely natural.  I stayed up all night digging on Kerouac and Lamantia and Rimbaud and Burroughs and Kabir and had no idea how anything fit with anything else.  Since I didn’t understand that I was standing in an historical moment I couldn’t see anything else as being a part of history.  It’s true, then, that the young cannot be historical materialists.  But they can feel the ecstasy of what they are experiencing.

 

I bought Patti Smith’s Horses after reading some of her poetry.  Of course, I ended up loving Patti Smith.  Just the idea that anyone could be that artistically impassioned, could be that crazy, mesmerized me.  But I also wanted the experience Michael Stipe had when he first heard her.  Stipe was an army brat who spent his high school years in Collinsville, Illinois.  Ethan Kaplan, writes of an earlier interview with Stipe where I learned of his interest in Patti: “When Stipe was 15 and in high school in St. Louis, he happened upon an issue of Creem magazine under his chair in study hall. Patti Smith was on the cover, looking like ‘Morticia Adams.’ Stipe went and bought Horses, which he claims ‘tore my limbs off and put them back on in a whole different order. I was like ‘Shit, yeah, oh my god!’ then I threw up.’”  In that instant I wanted to be Michael Stipe, not so I could be lead singer of an immensely popular band, but so that story about finding Patti Smith could be mine.  This was the story that really made me realize the power of art to transport us.

 

After a while, I became a pretty good young poet so I was blessed with some really good mentors who guided me through the history of art.  Since we only experience the present, we need others to teach us history.  This history led me through art for the next few years.

 

I am 30 now, married, sober.  I want art to be a little less strange now, a little more human.  I have gone in for the human story, for masters of the modest poetic.  I have started to welcome that human story.

The modest poetic is colored by disappointment, regret, by time passing.  Yet, it is not about living every moment as if it were your last.  It is about the choices that people make every day; that is why it is modest.  Thus, while the strange art that I loved as an 18-year-old (and which I still love now, but in a changed way) was often about the present, about the moment, about the new, the art of the modest poetic recognizes that life is long and full of consequences that matter. Thus, I want to feel more than dramatic weirdness; I want to know why I should feel this strangeness and I want to both know that others feel it too and why they feel it.

 

On my honeymoon, on Kauai, I read Updike’s Rabbit books and was moved and understood why I was moved.  That is, the story had prepared me to be moved in certain ways by character.  Updike shows the history of a disposition towards the world, which made me realize that the history of my own disposition towards the world could be understood by way of a narrative.

 

While the earlier work that I loved focused on the incomprehensibility of the moment, the later work seemed to say that the world, our choices, our lives, were understandable under the lens of a narrative.  Why has narrative become so much more important to me?  I suppose because my own life has a narrative.  I am, for better or worse, the self that made certain decisions, did certain things, read certain other things, etc.  As a 30 year old, I am no longer the sine-qua-non of my life.  I am somebody who has been some places.

 

Of course, nobody expresses the regret and hope of life better than Bruce Springsteen.  Loving Springsteen was really a turning point for me.  At first, when I was younger, he didn’t sound weird enough.  He sounded too straight, too much like somebody else would listen to him.  But then, his songs gave me stories that I could relate to; but that wasn’t really the strange part, which was that I wanted to relate to something, that relating had become important to me.

 

The increased importance of relating to others made me more empathetic in my aesthetic life.  I wanted to relate to more different ways of life, belief, and culture and I found that art was a way of doing this.  Of course, this is completely obvious, and is at least one of the main reasons that the arts are funded at all, but for me, it was a revelation that was deeply felt.  For example, I don’t know anything about football.  I’ve never played it and I don’t understand the rules.  But a show about a small town in Texas whose entire culture is completely focused on football, Friday Night Lights, sucked me in.  It is simply dramatic; nothing radical occurs, but they are human stories as they say, as I say now, as it is something I like to say now.  That is, it produced the empathy within me to care aesthetically about lives and games that in my ordinary life I would not care about.  Somehow, its emotional authenticity allowed me to recognize my own emotional life in that of the characters.  That is, it made me feel similar to others and that is what I want from art now.  I’m sure my tastes will change again, but I’m growing into these ones now.

Two Poems by Ruth Lepson

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Two Poems

by

Ruth Lepson

as if a tramp traveled along the train tracks

I listened to you in the night without a thought of myself

and the groom and the bride, night and day,

glanced shyly at each other

between the fierce winds and devil-may-care attitudes

 

if I had a thing to tell you

the end is just rain

wet endless rain

I would ask you

to soothe my brow

 

why are

dreams dark why am I

beginning to act in them with agency

 

naps, congregations, conjugations

the arrest of anticipation

all told, an improvement

 

to assuage it yet attend to another’s joy

that’s a neat trick

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 

The sun’s back out, better get back outside.

 

overheard:

“I didn’t want to buy anything. It’s sad when you can’t think of anything you want to buy.”

Swept the pine needles off the patio, friends coming to visit.

 

He says there isn’t going to be any winter, relax.

Bio: Ruth Lepson is poet-in-residence at the New England Conservatory of Music. In recent years she has collaborated with musicians, and her forthcoming book, Ask Anyone, will be accompanied by musical settings of her poems on the Pressed Wafer website. Her other books are Dreaming in Color (Alice James Books), Morphology, and I Went Looking for You (Both from BlazeVOX) and she edited Poetry from Sojourner: A Feminist Anthology (UIllinois). Her poems have appeared in Let the Bucket Down, Carve, SpoKe, Jacket2, Big Bridge, and many other journals.


Poetic Statement:
I can write only what I can write. Robert Creeley has been my main man, & I have learned immeasurably from him, as well as from Denise Levertov & Adrienne Rich. My conundrum is how to express emotion through sound & image in a contemporary way. These days I love Fanny Howe, Kate Greenstreet, Joseph Massey, and plenty of others—I seem to buy a book a day.

Two Poems by Vimeesh Maniyur

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Two Poems

by

Vimeesh Maniyur

Lip

Long back

He was called for making Thajmahal

A good, dirty man with talents

He Went.

One day he saw the Emperor

Heard an unknown toungue

May be he was the first in kerala

Who heard that…

It is stone not a white sun

There were no friends

In work they spoke one

They were one lettered humans

kept stone  like his letters

That day he spoke to the king

In dream… in his stone realm..

The man of palaces didnt get his stone-lip

Beheaded that kingdom

Never cameback.

Saw his rustic speech in its silence

True, It is fear not whiteness

The white geometry

As always

I looked into my android

There came a white geometry

 

Here and there roads

Here and there malls

Here and there talkies,

Hospitals, banks, A T M,

Railway station, hotels, pubs,

Café, bars, bus stand…..

Nothing but a white – haunted piece

Of barren world.

Where is this one, the road?

Hospital? Schools? army camp? Small teashops?

Loitering goats and many more….

Are they too big to map?

 

I looked again

Where I am?

 

Bio:  is an established bi-lingual poet, novelist and translator from kerala, in India. He has two volumes of poetry and a children’s novel in his credit. He has also penned stories and dramas. He has bagged for many prestigious awards such as Culcutta Malayali Samajam Endownment, Madras Kerala Samajam, Muttathu Varkki Katha Puraskaram etc. for young writers in kerala.

Three Poems by Wayne Mason

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Three Poems

by

Wayne Mason

wayne

Bio: Wayne Mason is a writer and sound artist from Central Florida. His words have appeared across the small press in magazines both print and online. He is the author of five chapbooks. and is the former poetry editor for Side Of Grits, and The Tampa Bay Muse. Wayne Mason has also been active in experimental music for nearly twenty years. He records ambient, experimental and noise sounds, formerly under the name of Zilbread, and is also a founding member of the experimental/noise project Stickfigure and electronic duo Blk/Mas. http://brokenzen.wordpress.com/

Poetic Statement:When I was much younger I aspired to change the world. Now years later, my work stems from a desire to change myself by exploring my own internalterrain. In the end the strangest, most profound journey is not the one outward, but the one inward through my own psychic landscapes.

The Parisians by AJ Kaufmann

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The Parisians

A Chapbook 

by AJ Kaufmann

Bio: I am a Polish poet and songwriter. I have been around the small-press poetry scene since 2008. “Siva in Rags” is my most recognized piece of work when it comes to English-language poetry, I think. I have been published in the USA (Kendra Steiner Editions mostly) and UK. My work has been also translated into Bulgarian, and I recorded and released 2 solo albums with self-penned songs. I also have a band.
Here are some links, where information about me can be found.